Vote For Membership Awards

The IQA is thrilled to invite teams to vote for th...
The IQA is thrilled to invite teams to vote for the annual Membership Awards. For more information on the awards and how to vote, read on. membership awards slider Photo by Isabella Gong/IQA Staff One designated representative from each IQA official member team may vote once in each category on behalf of their team via this link Please read through the nominations before voting, and direct questions to Membership Director Katie Stack at membership@internationalquidditch.org. Voting will be open for one week, ending at 11:59pm EST on Saturday, June 1st. Ties will be resolved by IQA Teams Department staff. Winners will be announced at QuidCon 2013 in Seattle (July 11-15) and posted online following the event. Click on an award name to see the list of nominees. IQA Sportsmanship Award The Xander Manshel Award The First Year Survival Award The #swag Award The Portkey Award (new) Event awards earned by member teams are: The “Better than the World Cup” Award The “Better than the Weasley/Delacour Wedding” Award The “Money is Might” Award Team awards: IQA Sportsmanship Award The IQA Sportsmanship Award goes to the team that has demonstrated an overall commitment to sportsmanship through fair play, generosity, and integrity. They accept both victory and defeat graciously and hold a great respect for competitors, teammates, officials, and fans alike. The Milano Meneghins (Milan, IT) The Milano Meneghins embody sportsmanship in everything they do. As the only Italian team at the European Championship last fall, they quickly became friends with everyone present through free hugs and a general upbeat attitude. They played well for a first year team, placing third overall, and were gracious in their victories yet the first to point out the positive things the winning team did when they lost. In Italy, the Meneghins are the leaders in the spread of quidditch nationally, but are inclusive of others in national decision-making and have traveled to Reggio Emilia and Brindisi to play with and encourage new teams. New York Badassilisks (New York, NY) Their immense dedication to the sport, and great sportsmanship, became obvious at the Northeast Regional. Despite not earning a world cup bid, they were one of the few non-contending teams to have a presence at the end of the day at closing ceremonies. Their team members are heavily involved in the quidditch community, with a few serving in high-profile positions at World Cup VI. When played against their sportsmanship is always magnificent, and their dedication unrivaled- their dedication to themselves as a team, but also to quidditch as a whole. badassilisks3 Sam Houston State University (Huntsville, TX) SHSU has been around for a few years now and have always been known for their friendliness.  They are some of the most spunky and good-hearted quidkids out there.   Their team has come amazingly far since they started a few years ago, and even though they have become more and more competitive in the region, they've never lost their good sportsmanship. UCLA (x3) (Los Angeles, CA) UCLA is a team that is humble in every victory, and graceful and supportive of the victor, in every defeat. They play with the feelings of others in mind, even when the most is on the line. UCLA, despite being the clear winner in almost every game they play, is generally considered one of every team's favorite teams to play. They allow their skill and abilities to speak for them on the field and always have a great attitude. Not only are they great on the field, but they are supportive off the field. When they aren't busy cheering on their comrades, the entire team can always be counted on to help out with anything that a tournament director might need. If there was ever an exemplary sportsmanlike team, it was UCLA. This team has shown time and time again what it means to have good sportsmanship. Known for their clean play, their adherence to the rules is only the least impressive of their showings of sportsmanship. Off the field, they spend a significant amount of time cheering on friends and rivals alike (the most notable case being their undying friendship with their bitter school rivals, University of Southern California). They do not brag in victory, and they do not sulk in defeat. This fact was shown most clearly at World Cup VI. Upon their heartbreaking loss to the University of Texas, UCLA had every right to be disappointed. They could've walked away and said nothing, and no one would've blamed them. Instead, they stood behind the champions in their time of celebration and, as a team, raised the Hook ‘Em Horns sign in admiration and congratulations. That's the mark of true sportsmanship. ucla2 University of Rochester (x2) (Rochester, NY) University of Rochester believes in having a good time and always respecting their opponents. They have a high esteem for the refs and the rules while still playing competitive quidditch. Every encounter my team [The WEQL Griffins] has had with UofR, they have been the utmost respectful to us, both on and off the pitch. I'd venture so far as to say they are one of the reasons we've come so far. Never have they attempted foul play against us, always following the rules to the letter. Off the pitch, they've given us tips on how to improve, suggestions on what to do. There is no doubt in my mind that UofR deserves the IQA Sportsmanship Award. uofr2 Xander Manshel Award The recipient of the Xander Manshel Award truly embodies the spirit of the IQA. By furthering the IQA's mission of creativity, community, and competition, this team has enabled the culture of quidditch to spread to a greater demographic while continuing to focus on their own competitive spirit. Denver Dementors (Denver, CO) Despite the long drive and potential for bad weather, the Denver Dementors made the long journey to SW Regionals in February.  Though they didn't end up qualifying for World Cup, they fought hard and had a great time.  They opened many SW players' eyes to the way of being both competitive and whimsical.  Their presence at Regionals was a great addition to the atmosphere of the quidditch weekend. Macaulay Honors College (New York, NY) Macaulay embodies the spirit of quidditch by fostering a community of fun-loving but competitive quidditch players completely dedicated to the sport, to the IQA and to consistently improving their gameplay. macaulayquidditch2 Melbourne Manticores (Melbourne,  Australia) The Melbourne Manticores began just over 2 years ago with 9 players. In the last year the Manticores have singlehandedly fostered 7 new teams in Victoria. They consistently come up with creative ways of spreading the word about quidditch whether it be talking their way into playing exhibition matches at pop culture conventions, or running public Come-Try Days every second weekend. They've encouraged a caring and fun loving community in Victoria which is more like a QuidFamily and they have now created the Victorian Quidditch Association to broaden their community. The Manticores made up the majority of Team Australia for the Summer Games (filling 6 spots), flew to Cairns (2,956.6 km/ 1,837mi) to win the Cairns Classic Quidditch Tournament, and later in the year flew to Sydney (877km/545mi) for Australia's QUAFL Tournament where, despite ‘expert' predictions of a last place finish, they fought their way to 4th. They are now fostering a more competitive nature between the Victorian  teams by founding the Victorian Winter League against each other to help the new teams to train for competitive tournaments. melbourne2 UCLA (Los Angeles, CA) UCLA plays quidditch as quidditch was originally imagined to be played. They play with the utmost camaraderie, teamwork, and sportsmanship all the while deriving incredible success from their model. TSP-12 University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) uOttawa Quidditch exemplifies the spirit of quidditch and the IQA. The team actively helps other teams across the country and many members volunteer in the IQA, ensuring Canadian representation. The team also reaches out to other organizations to host events, from sororities to ultimate frisbee teams to student associations to boy scout troops. The club is a strong community, made of competitive players, recreational players, and non-playing community members, creating their own ohana. The team traveled almost 4000 km this past year alone to compete in tournaments across Eastern Canada and the United States, placing second at the Canadian Cup and culminating in an impressive showing at the World Cup, which they had to fundraise 9000$ and defer dozens of exams in order to attend. They support each others' musical careers, they work hard through snow and dark, cold 6 a.m. practices, and they support and cheer for other teams and for each other. University of Vermont (Burlington, VT) University of Vermont brought quidditch back to its roots at Northeast Regional. With their tie dye jerseys, their penchant for only turning at right angles on the pitch, and their regular lapses into dinosaur mode, they established themselves as one of the most unique and friendly teams to play at the tournament. Utah Crimson Fliers (Salt Lake City, UT) The Utah Crimson Fliers exhibit great hospitality, generosity, and drive with their annual Snow Cup tournament. Despite not earning a World Cup VI bid, they still created their now-famous trading cards, and sent three of their team members to ref and snitch at world-class levels. Their dedication, from throwing great tournaments and housing everyone who needs it, to dedication on the personal level by players, as well as their contributions through trading cards, makes them absolutely deserving of the Xander Manshel award. Virginia Commonwealth University (Wizengamot at VCU) (Richmond, VA) Wizengamot has gone above and beyond this year to embody the qualities listed for this award. In addition to mentoring other Mid-Atlantic teams and even one abroad (JCU Galleons of the Australian Quidditch Association),  Wizengamot has used their platform to expand the scope, knowledge, and legitimacy of quidditch at every opportunity, while still thriving as a competitive presence. Plus, they still might get on Jimmy Fallon, which is arguably the epitome of spreading the sport to a greater demographic, and one of the biggest PR stunts the sport will have seen to date. vcu First Year Survival Award This award goes to a first year team that has demonstrated impressive leadership and substantial growth. They have already substantially contributed to the thriving IQA community by participating in and hosting events, and have also interacted with their community through social outreach. Boston Riot (Boston, MA) How can a small liberal arts college provide enough players for two teams? Start a riot, that's how. The Boston Riot, known by many at the outset as the “B” team of Emerson, evolved into anything but a B team. Hosting fundraising tournaments, delivering dumplings, and having one of the loudest cheers at Northeast Regional, they quickly developed a unique name and look for themselves. Not to mention their sweet logo design, and general attitude towards quidditch; competitive, but having fun. Due to their success as a team, it will move forward again next year and continue to live on. boston riot2 Central Michigan University Centaurs (Mount Pleasant, MI) As a first year team with the IQA, the Central Centaurs have revealed immense leadership and have shown incredible growth. At the Midwest Regional Championship, the Centaurs beat Miami OH, GVSU, Saint Mary's and even had a close game with Ball State, some spectators commenting that it was ‘some of the best quidditch' they had ever watched. Due to an international team dropping out of World Cup, the Centaurs were given a chance to redeem themselves. The team surprised everyone as they took the win against Villanova 60-50 with the snitch snatch. They were then congratulated by many as they took the victory against Austin Quidditch 80-50. The second day they were defeated by USC, but to make it to World Cup and to turn heads as a first year team, was incredible. They have shown growth not only in their wins but in their ability to lose as well. Central centaurs2 Florida State University (Tallahassee, FL) Florida State Quidditch was founded in November of 2011 by our 2011-2013 President, Eric Schnier, and became IQA official for the 2012-2013 season. During this first year, they have become established at FSU as a club sports team, as well as become a fully functional traveling team. The team traveled to, and won, the Rocky Top Tournament hosted by Tennessee Tech, as well as competed at several tournaments in the area. FSU Quidditch also competed at regionals, during which they earned a spot to compete in D1 at World Cup VI. The team hosted a miniature meet in the spring with UCF and UF attending, and this July they will be hosting the south regional fantasy tournament. fsu2 India Point Ashwinders (Providence, RI) IPA is a new community team based out of Providence Rhode Island. Although they did not compete in the Northeast Regional Tournament, they did volunteer work for it. Even though they didn't compete in the tournament they received the sportsmanship award from the tournament. They became more impressive when they joined with the URI team to make a merc team for The End of the World Tournament in NYC. The SNEQC Snidgets merc team was not about winning. It was about bonding, which is the whole reason behind muggle quidditch's creation. Although they had a rough start in the SNEQC league they quickly rose through the ranks. At the last end of the school year tournament they won 1st place. In their first year as a team they have taken home two awards. One of them was an IQA officially recognized award. This team from the smallest state has just started growing. A team that started out with 7 players now has around 13 players. They have never had a 7 on 7 practice. Their potential is limitless. ipa2 Lock Haven University (Lock Haven, PA) Much has been said this semester already about Lock Haven. From inception to their tournament appearances this season, they have grown to a high level of play very quickly, all the while maintaining wonderful attitudes on and off pitch. Roadrunner Quidditch (San Antonio, TX) Roadrunner Quidditch has had one of the most impressive first years in quidditch.  They made several tournament appearances before they attended regionals and earned a World Cup bid in one of the toughest regions around.  They traveled to World Cup and their team fought incredibly hard.  It's amazing to see all they've accomplished this season, and the league should have high expectations for their next season. Santa Barbara Blacktips (Santa Barbara, CA) This team's first ever practice occurred on July 21st, 2012, and had a total of 4 people from Santa Barbara in attendance (plus some quidditch players from the LA area that were there for assistance). Since then, the team has ballooned into the spotlight. They gained IQA official status in October, and gave a dominating performance in their first tournament the following month. The team has already shown a stunning commitment to travelling, including a 750+ mile (each way) trip to Salt Lake City for the Utah Snow Cup, a tournament that gained them the cover of the Winter issue of Quidditch Quarterly. At Western Regionals, they played a grueling 9 matches over two days, earning 7th place and eventually being offered the chance to attend World Cup VI. Although the team was not able to attend the World Cup this year, they decided to instead host a tournament, the Beachside Brawl (making them one of the few community teams to ever do so). santa barbara2 Tennessee Tech Quidditch (Cookeville, TN) TTU did it all this year: reached official status, hosted a very successful tournament, and had a Cinderella run at their regional championship, to name a few. Their second place finish put them on the radar of every team in the region, and they have earned their status as a team to watch next season. The Lost Boys (Lomita, CA) In their first season as an IQA official team, The Lost Boys have grown from what was a rag-tag team of former players to a well-established institution within the Western Quidditch world. On the field, they got second at the Western Regional Cup. They got 5th overall at World Cup after defeating well-established teams with long track records such as Maryland, and only losing to BGSU in a game that was near tied its entire duration. They then went on to win the Beachside Brawl tournament earlier this month. Off the pitch, the Lost Boys have hosted numerous quidditch events and tournaments. Traveling all over the region to compete, organizing a nine team, end of season tournament/BBQ, and many more various social events, the Lost Boys have quickly become a beacon that the LA quidditch community has rallied around. University of Toledo Firebolts (Toledo, OH) Under the guidance of Alex Scheer, this team was founded, began a friendly rivalry with Bowling Green State University, and set a good pace for the club, participating in the Midwest Regional Championship and competing at World Cup VI, which is becoming an increasingly impressive feat for a rookie team. On top of all the standard fanfare seen by fresh teams, Toledo took it a step above and beyond by making some revolutionary advancements for the sport of quidditch. Most notable of these was the set of matches they hosted against Bowling Green that was broadcast on BCSN, a first live cable airing for quidditch. University of Toronto, Scarborough (Toronto, ON) In UTSC's first year, they participated in the Canadian Cup in Kingston, two tournaments hosted by McMaster Quidditch, a tournament at Fleming College, and a tournament at Ryerson University. They also hosted their own tournament complete with a fun games night fundraiser as well as hosting open practices, inviting quidditch players across their region to play in Toronto while on holiday, building a sense of community. They held two sessions with the Young Carers, teaching kidditch to kids ages 5-14. UTSC also took initiative and were leaders in the creation of a tournament schedule for the 2013/2014 season in association with other Toronto teams. #swag Award This award goes to the team that has achieved the most powerful visual and physical presence, otherwise known as #swag. With a combination of uniforms, banners, war cheers, facepaint, the recipient of this award has created a unique style and flare that distinguishes the team from all others. McGill Quidditch (Montréal, QC) This quid bunch is much more than a sports team – it's also a tightly-knit group of friends who share a love for the game, fizzing whizzbees, and each other. They often express this solidarity through their impeccably-coordinated stylistic choices, from their dashing red jerseys to their fierce face paint. Their McQuid cheers are unique and (perhaps) exemplary of a collective literary finesse. In short, they possess some serious #swag. mcgill2 Northern Arizona University Narwhals (x2) (Flagstaff, AZ) These guys constantly define #swag. At Western Cup they rolled up with their ghetto blaster blasting music for their entrance. They later saved the day with said blaster by bringing it to the dance after (there were difficulties with the speakers). Their IndieGoGo campaign included the perk of receiving a picture of their butts. In short, this team is a ton of fun and has the swag to back it up. Dyed hair. Names on butts. Boombox. And they do this when the referee asks them if they're ready: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDXgt-i2kBU **drops mic** NAU#swag2 Queen's University Quidditch (Kingston, ON) Canadian teams are known for their #swag. Facepaint, banners, war cheers, and unique uniforms are all important parts of Canadian Quidditch. However, one team takes this to a whole new level. Queen's Quidditch may just personify #swag. The team's unique tri-colour spirit is famous in their region. It is a rallying point, a way of life, and builds community, school spirit, and team pride. Syracuse Quidditch (Syracuse, NY) If you sift through photos from World Cup, you might find one from the opening parade: a sea of orange, led by a man with a clipboard, cup of coffee, and dressed in a suit and tie. Needless to say, the clipboard had an interesting message related to their game plan. That, my friends, is the definition of #swag: concise, to the point, and hilarious. cuse22 Tec Quidditch (Monterrey, MX) Tec Quidditch arrived at WCVI in style. With noisemakers, red and green pom poms, wrestling masks, clown wigs in the Mexican colors, and Mexican flags as capes, the Tec team made their presence known. The team also had energy and made opening ceremonies the first day feel like a true party when they arrived. Tec Quidditch truly embraced their cultural heritage to present themselves with the most recognizable aspects of their country and the team was easily distinguished from any other team at WC for this reason. University of Maryland (College Park, MD) The University of Maryland cuts a commanding presence on any field they enter with their unique black, red and yellow jerseys, matching socks and shorts and an intense cheer. umd2 *Photo by Deanna Edmunds University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI) They pretty much bought out the entire stock of “children of the corn” tank tops at the 2012 Midwest cup and wore them for the entirety of the tournament. Have you seen those tanks? They scream #swag. michigan2 University of Rhode Island (Kingston, RI) Our team has spirit. We love quidditch. We aren't here for the games. We're here for the team bonding and the relationships. Our club is a place where all people can be themselves in their own skins. We share a special relationship with all teams we play. Our team spearheaded a quidditchmerc team for the End of the World Tournament in NYC. During our final game of the season in the bronze medal game our team and Clark Quidditch took a nap at the start of our game. Unfortunately our ref called us out for illegal contact of two hugging players. Campaign video from current URI quidditch president: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=567251626621307&set=vb.100000094247566&type=3&permPage=1 Portkey Award This award recognizes a team that has traveled extensively during the 2012-2013 season, based on most events attended and farthest distance traveled. Through these efforts, the team has demonstrated a dedication to the quidditch community and the improvement of its gameplay.  Fleming Quidditch (Lindsay, ON) Fleming Quidditch is a brand new team that has logged a lot of travel time and travelled a total of 2466.5 km in their first year. They played at the Canadian Cup in Kingston, Ontario, a 238,8 km trip. Determined to show some Canadian Quidditch pride at World Cup VI, they drove 2,227.7 km from Lindsay, Ontario, to Kissimmee Florida… and then back again. In total, Fleming spent 48 hours driving. Hofstra University (Hempstead, NY) Hofstra has played over 30 games this season at a variety of venues, from tournaments in New York City all the way to Philadelphia for the Brotherly Love Cup and Maryland for the Shell Shocking Spectacular, and to Florida for the World Cup. Playing so much in so many different places has given our team the experience it needed to improve and has helped us become better acquainted with the amazing quidditch community that surrounds us. Kansas Quidditch (Lawrence, KS) Being located in the center of the country, having few teams located in our area (and none active in our state) Kansas Quidditch had to travel extensively this year to tournaments. Tournaments attended: SE-Iowa Invitational Cowboy Cup (Oklahoma State University) Kansas Cup (home tournament) Midwest Regionals (Mason, Ohio) Collegiate Cup (Olathe, Kansas) Spring Breakout Tournament (Columbia, Missouri) World Cup (Kissimmee, Florida) Hogshead Invitational (Fayetville, Arkansas) kansas Milano Meneghins (Milan, IT) The Meneghins have been tireless in the traveling they have done, both within the country of Italy and abroad. They were the only Italian team present at the European Championship, traveling 668 miles each way. They are also avid travelers in Italy; using their presence to promote quidditch and encourage new teams in their country, the Meneghins went to tournaments in Reggio-Emilia ((95.8mi) and Brindisi (619.9mi). The team is not finished traveling either, with a trip to Verona (99.5mi) planned for June to promote quidditch at a large comic/fantasy event. In total, the team has traveled a total of 2,966.4 miles in one year (though if they had managed to make it to the WC, there would have been nearly another 10,000 miles). And that's not even counting the distance most players have to travel weekly to reach the pitch; some players who don't live in Milan travel more than an hour one way to practice weekly. Perth Phoenixes (Perth, AU-WA) The Perth Phoenixes are a community team out of Perth, Western Australia and have been on the quidditch scene since November, 2011. The Phoenixes are the IQA's most isolated official team, with the closest official team being 3400km's (2112 miles) away, on the other side of Australia. Because of this, the team has to board a 3 hour flight to even play an officially ranked game. 2012 saw the Phoenixes take the long trip to New South Wales twice. In July they competed in the Inaugural MidWinter Cup in Newcastle (a 3 hour train trip on top of the 3 hour flight) where they took home the winning trophy. In December they again took the 3 hour flight to Sydney to partake in QUAFL which saw mixed results. perth2 QC Carolinas (Winston-Salem, NC) This “merc” team of mostly North Carolina players rapidly traveled to play in games and tournaments across four states over the second half of the season. University of Miami (Coral Gables, FL) Traveling for quidditch is to be expected at this point, but UMiami surprised when they announced a team trip to Los Angeles. They went not for any tournament in particular, but simply to play the LA teams whose reputation preceded them. They became the first to bring quidditch cross country outside the World Cup. University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) uOttawa Quidditch travelled 3780.2km to attend tournaments across Eastern Canada and the United States. The team participated in friendly tournaments in Montreal, Canada (200.1 km), and Rochester, United States (441.6 km), large tournaments such as the Ives Pond Invitational in Buffalo, United States (541.3), and official IQA events such as the Canadian Cup in Kingston, Canada (195.5 km), and World Cup VI in Kissimmee, United States (2401.7 km). Event awards: “Better than the World Cup” Award This award commemorates the most successful quidditch tournament run by a team or group of teams (not the IQA administration), based on funds, gameplay, and community integration. Midwinter Cup – Newcatle Fireballs (Newcastle, AU-NSW) In the Midwinter Cup's inaugural year of 2012 it encouraged teams across Australia from as far as Perth to converge in Newcastle. The Newcastle Quidditch Society nailed their first attempt at holding a tournament, providing great value for money, an experience few would forget and enough mud that it could never quite be washed out. The level of care and detail given is what truly sets this tournament apart, the Newcastle Quidditch Society provided breakfast and a catered lunch both days of the tournament, a bus to transport teams to and from the accommodation that was offered to every attendee of the tournament and catered German food for the Saturday night social event. midwinter cup2 Diamond Cup – Texas State University (San Marcos, TX) Texas State hosted their first tournament this past year, and what an amazing tournament it was!  The event was well-planned and incredibly well run.  The field conditions were good despite the surprisingly cold weather that day.  By the final match, the stands were filled with spectators cheering for each team, and everyone was pleased with the tournament planning team. Turtle Cup – University of Maryland (College Park, MD) An extremely solid tournament with just the right mix of professionalism and fun, UMD's Turtle Cup 2012 once again set the bar for how much fun a quidditch tournament can be. Shell-Shocking Spectacular – University of Maryland (College Park, MD) University of Maryland's tournaments have earned a well-deserved reputation for being awesome. The Shell-Shocking Spectacular provided an excellent mix of outstanding gameplay, streamlined organization, and that spirit and sense of community that moves a tournament from good to great. “Turned Out Better than the Weasley/Delacour Wedding” Award This award commemorates the most successful quidditch community social event of the year run by a team or group of teams (not the IQA administration) based on funds, community integration, and FUN! Jingle Bell Tournament – Boston Riot (Boston, MA) Summer fantasy is great, but what about during the year? Drawing on a large pool of Boston quidditch players, the Boston Riot successfully got a fantasy-esque tournament together, bringing together players from cross-city rivals Boston University, Tufts, and Emerson to play on teams together. With their team fees paid, they all duked it out for the chance at being the one on top. Needless to say, it brought together many teams and was overall fun for everyone involved! boston riot emily oliver photography2 *Photo provided by Emily Oliver Photography Yule Ball – McGill Quidditch (Montréal, QC) This year on February 8, 2013 something extraordinary happened- the McGill Quidditch team held their annual Yule Ball. Now this is no regular, muggle party; this was the event of the year. For only $4 (including coat check!!) you could get your ticket into the bar, which looked practically identical to the Hogwarts meal hall, with its enchanted ceiling and everything. Semi-formal attire was required so ladies and gents, warlocks and wizards alike showed up wearing their finest suits and best dresses. Music played all night long and if you were lucky, you could get to the front of the long line to get the extremely sought after butterbeer which was the crowd favorite of the night. It was simply an enchanting evening full of laughs, dancing, fun, and, of course, magic! mcgill2 2013 Yule Ball – University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI) It was a complete success. The University of Michigan team ended up selling out all 350 tickets. The decorations were amazing; the event had a great photobooth; the team raised over $1,000 for the world cup and everyone had a blast. umich2 “Money is Might” Award This award commemorates the most successful fundraiser for a quidditch team based on creativity, awareness, and funds raised. Yule Ball – Arizona State University (Tempe, AZ) ASU put on a Yule Ball in November to raise funds for the Western Cup. This dance took about 4 months of planning. In the last week and a half 15 6 foot, 3-­dimensional, cardboard “Christmas” trees had to be made – these were cut out, assembled, painted silver, then decorated with hundreds of blue lights and snowflakes. There were over 350 ASU students and guests in attendance at the dance and over $4000 was raised with this one event. This almost entirely paid for the Western Cup for the team. Considering this was the first year the team had ever attempted anything like this, it was a huge success. Many ASU students thanked the team saying on several occasions “this was better than my high school prom”. Indiegogo Campaign – Emerson College (Boston, MA) For a brief time, on the front of the Sports group page for Indiegogo, you could find Emerson College Quidditch gracing it. But they didn't stop there. Launching a massive social media campaign that involved tweeting at (and being retweeted by) athletes and prominent figures, Emerson College Quidditch pushed one of the quidditch world's favorite mediums to its limit and beyond: Social media. By pushing heavily with a social media attack and neat awards, their campaign was largely successful having raised their initial goal of $4,000 in only 4 days, and ultimately raising over $7,000. emerson2 Indiegogo Campaign – University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) From their (in)famous calendar to their unique mix of Indiegogo  incentives, UOttawa found the right formula for fundraising success this season. Their tenacious bid to reach World Cup was one of the most well-publicized, and they used this status to blow past their fundraising goals and find themselves in sunny Florida last April. Quidditch Trading Cards – Utah Crimson Fliers (Salt Lake City, UT) Originally masterminded by Eric Williams, and currently headed by Jen Jewell, this is easily one of the most creative and popular fundraisers that any team has ever done. Numerous tournaments have used their services already, and quidditch trading cards of hundreds of players now exist in circulation. The IQA website and Quidditch Quarterly have both written articles about it, praising it for its creativity and wide-spread appeal. I don't know how much money the event has made… but I'm sure it's a lot. utah trading cards2 Indiegogo Campaign – Virginia Commonwealth University (Wizengamot Quidditch) (Richmond, VA) (x2) Fueled by a wildly charismatic online awareness campaign as well as an indiegogo perk of actually tattoing a chaser, the VCU WC VI fundraiser allowed them to shatter their goals and make it to WC with money left over for next season. Wizengamot's Indiegogo campaign was one of the most financially successful WCVI fundraisers to ever occur. Many donations were from third-party sources, as well as friends and family of the team. Bringing in over $4,000 in a month's time with rewards ranging from stickers to the infamous ‘Tattoo-A-Chaser' option, the fundraiser achieved even further success when an anonymous donor pledged to match all independently-raised dollars until the end of February. This generous donation, in combination with other small fundraisers, brought the total amount raised to just over $9,000 for the spring semester, enabling the team to travel to WCVI at the most minimal cost possible.