Michigan State Captures Glass City

Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI) won t...
Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI) won the Glass City Classic Tournament last weekend, going undefeated in four games against some of the biggest names in the Midwest. No. 24 MSU beat No. 16 Michigan Quidditch (Ann Arbor, MI) in the championship game with a final score of 80*-50. “We spent a lot of extra time practicing [for the tournament],” Will Hack, coach and captain of MSU, said. “We knew from the first day it was going to be tough.” Photo by Kim Gallagher The team also defeated the College of Wooster (Wooster, OH), Ohio State University (Columbus, OH), and Bowling Green State University (Bowling Green, OH) in the leadup to their title, dropping just one contest 60*-30 to Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN). Hack explained that the semifinal match against BGSU was one of the toughest games for his team. “We had just played one of the most difficult games we ever played against OSU [with a final score 70*^-60] in overtime,” he recalled. “We were all pretty exhausted going in, but when we came out we gave it our all. We were 40 ahead, but couldn't catch the snitch. The game kept going longer and longer.” Finally, BGSU tied the match at 120 with a snitch grab, sending the contest into overtime. “It was one of the most intense moments in quidditch. The captains came out and said however it turns out, this has been one of the best games we've ever played,” Hack said of the matchup. Eventually though, MSU prevailed, catching the snitch in overtime for a final score of 150^-120*. The team then went on to beat Michigan Quidditch, who had rolled into the finals undefeated. Although Michigan would have obviously liked to win, David Brownman, Director of External Relations for Michigan Quidditch, explained that his team was looking beyond Glass City in their preparation. “We're trying to rotate [players] to get a better indication of who to bring to World Cup,” Brownman said. “We didn't bring some of the faster, more agile players, though [agility] is not as effective in the snow.” Although Michigan lost to MSU, they were able to dominate the lone team that vanquished the Spartans. Michigan conquered Purdue in the semifinals, winning 120*-30. “Purdue is a great team,” Brownman said. “We only played them once before, so we weren't as sure [what the outcome would be]. But we were able to keep bludger control and defended the snitch.” Another large presence at the tournament was OSU, who Hack described as “a very scary looking team.” Currently ranked No. 37, the team faced Grand Valley State University (Allendale Charter Township, MI), The Charles School at Ohio Dominican University (Columbus, OH), Michigan Quidditch, and MSU. “This tournament was the best we've ever played,” OSU beater Luke Changet said. “It was one of the things that I think made losing to Michigan State in the quarter finals so painful because we were playing the best quidditch we've ever played. We were making a lot of big hits, we were playing well on offense - really, everything was coming together for us.” According to Changet,what ultimately hurt OSU was the team's failure to overcome MSU's seeking. “We were up 40-10 when they caught the snitch the first time,” Changet said. “We were up 60-40 the second time. We had bludger control the entire time… We were playing tight defense and taking advantage of scoring opportunities. We were really dominating that game in every aspect except for the snitch grab and that hurt us.” BCSN, the Buckeye College Sports Network, aired the semifinal and final matches on television as well as their website for those who could not attend in person. Alex Scheer, University of Toledo (Toledo, OH) captain and organizer of the tournament said the network was wonderful and accommodating despite minor weather-related setbacks. “They've done a great job and this broadcast they did even better because now they knew what to prepare for,” Scheer said. “They had a very specialized snitch cam for when the snitch was on the pitch. They did a very great job and they were ever so willing to work around our time delays and they were very patient with us. So I give a huge kudos to them for their patience and willingness to film a little bit later than what we were planning.” Two teams dropped out days before the tournament began because of snowy conditions, though the games continued only slightly after their scheduled times on both Saturday and Sunday. “[The snow] forced us to start the tournament a little bit later…but other than that [there were] no real major hiccups,” Scheer said. “We had to move schedules around a little bit, but it was seemingly pretty successful. Overall, I was pretty happy for this being our first tournament with none of [us] having any real tournament organization in our background.” Katy Rapnicki of Miami University (Oxford, OH) said that despite the weather, her team enjoyed bonding with other teams while playing a game they all love. “We love quidditch tournaments,” Rapnicki said. “We love seeing other teams and making friends with other teams. It was cold, but everyone was excited. There were a lot of changes, but it was very organized....Quidditch is such a unique sport. You play your heart out, while on and off the field everyone is really friendly and respectful.”